EXHIBITS

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Food Waste in Cache Valley

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Donations to Cache Community Food Pantry

Though there is no formal system such as Grocery Rescue (SLC), Hole Food Rescue (Jackson Hole), or the Food Recovery Network (USU Dining Services), informal agreements between Cache Community Food Pantry and local grocery stores exist. 12,000 - 14,000 pounds of food are donated from every store in the valley each month, amounting to 78 tons per year. This recovery reduces carbon dioxide equivalent emissions by 114 metric tons per year [1]. 

Grocery Recovery

Local grocers (Smith's, Macey's, and Lee's) also contribute to Cache Community Food Pantry by donating their nearly expired baked goods. Most all other products are thrown out at the expiration date including: meats, produce, and canned foods [2]. 

An Issue in Cache Valley Schools

Case Study: Edith Bowen Elementary

During the average lunchtime, Edith Bowen Elementary school serves 160 children and has 27.07 pounds of waste from fruit and vegetables alone. This means that approximately 80 servings (or 1/2 serving per child) of fruit or vegetables is tossed.

If this food was composted instead of landfilled it would save .627 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent each year. If the food was donated or reused, it would save .836 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent yearly.

Case Study: Bridger Elementary

A low-income area school, Bridger Elementary serves approximately 480 students daily and generates 157.6 pounds of waste from fruits and vegetables alone. This means that approximately 470 servings of fruit or vegetables were tossed, almost one serving per child.

If this food was composted instead of landfilled, it would save 3.7 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent. If it was donated or reused, it would save 4.95 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent [3].

Composting Options

Curbside Green Waste

Logan City offers curbside green waste collection from March to November for not just Logan, but Hyde Park, Hyrum, Millville, Nibley, North Logan, Providence, River Heights, Smithfield, and Wellsville. A one year commitment of $4/ month is required for this service [4]. This green waste is composted and sold at an affordable price.

However, Logan City Composting does not currently accept any food scraps. All leftover food, even fresh fruits and vegetables, are landfilled [5].

Composting at Home

Logan City encourages composting at home, and offers tips for how to do so [6].

1. Waste Reduction Model (WARM). (2015, March). Retrieved April 20, 2016, from https://www3.epa.gov/epawaste/conserve/tools/warm/Warm_Form.html 
2. Grocery Food Waste [Personal Interview]. (2016, April 12)
3. Reidhead, A. (2016). Typescript in preparation, Utah State University. 
4. Curbside Green Waste. (2016). Retrieved April 20, 2016, from http://www.loganutah.org/government/departments/environmental/green_waste/curbside_green_waste.php 
5. Phone call to Logan City Landfill [Telephone interview]. (2016, April 19). 
6. Logan City. (n.d.). [Brochure]. Author. Retrieved from http://www.loganutah.org/document_center/Environmenta/HomeComposting.pdf